Thursday, September 06, 2007

THE PRATS RIDE THE SPECIAL BUS

Perhaps one of the most “developmentally delayed” - and yet paradoxically miles ahead of the pack - releases of the go-go late 70s would be the three tracks from THE PRATS that made it to the EARCOM 1 record on the Fast Product label. These Scots helped redefine shambling, spasmodic, inepto-rock. Their primitiveness to me almost comes off as a bit forced at times (“Inverness”), but damn me if I still don’t totally dig listening to their joyous mess when I get the gumption. It defines the learning-to-play-on-the-job ethos of late 70s Britain, and a period that generated some of finest 45s of any era. The EARCOM 1 12” compilation was a collection of “up and coming” bands from the British Isles, and also included the BLANK STUDENTS, the much-underrated FLOWERS and others. EARCOM 2 came out a year or so later, and had legendary eardrum rippers from Americans like the MIDDLE CLASS and NOH MERCY.

Well, I’m hoping to help kick up a cloud of PRATS mania, since it turns out there’s a new compilation of their compleat works now out called “Now That’s What I Call Prats Music”. One of their songs even turned up in the remake of “The Manchurian Candidate” that no one saw. Lots more to learn & do over at their site, but in the meantime, here’s those Earcom 1 tracks.

Play or Download THE PRATS – “Prats 2”
Play or Download THE PRATS – “Inverness”
Play or Download THE PRATS – “Bored”

2 comments:

Daniel said...

hey jay-

Earcom 2 was the 12" with Joy DIvision, Thursdays and Bascax. Earcom 3 was the double 7" w/ Noh Mercy, Stupid Babies, From Chorley, DAF and The Middle Class.

Pretty amazing that Bob Last had his ear to the ground to west coast stuff like Middle Class and Noh Mercey. Fast also put out the first UK pressing of the Dead Kennedys.

Of course then there was Pop Aural and the Fire Engines, hey, they're studio stuff is finally back in print! http://www.acuterecords.com

-dan selzer

Drindle said...

Love the Pratts, Disco Pope and all that. I was never able to find anything beyond the 1990's Pop EP back in the day. Love it, thanks